What Stands in the Way of Modi’s Digital India – The Numbers – WSJ

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has grand plans to expand the reach of the Internet to his country’s most far-flung citizens.  But some big numbers stand in his way.

1.06 billion

The number of Indians who currently don’t have access to the Internet. India’s offline population is greater than that of China and Indonesia–home to the next two largest unconnected groups–combined.

1 million

The number of miles of fiber optic cable needed to connect 250,000 village clusters in India to the Internet, according to a committee set up to get the project into gear. The original plan estimated that 370,000 miles of cable would do the job.

1%

The proportion of clusters of villages that up to June 30 were fully connected to Internet services in community centers, hospitals and schools under the National Fiber Optic Network that was launched in 2011.

2013

The original deadline for completion of the network. The date has since been shunted back twice and now stands at 2019.

$11.2 billion

The revised budget for the fiber optic network. Almost four times what was originally planned.

via What Stands in the Way of Modi’s Digital India – The Numbers – WSJ.

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3 Comments to “What Stands in the Way of Modi’s Digital India – The Numbers – WSJ”

  1. What Stands in the Way of Modi’s Digital India – The Numbers

    No doubt the numbers are staggering, but the project implementation has to start from some point!

    Now what is required is a good planning (for all aspects of the project) and tough management with determination to succeed! All those involved should be given realistic and measurable deadlines to meet the various stages of the project.

    However it is easy said than done!

    Like

    • Ramesh – this is one area India should excel. It has several IITs producing tech graduates that rank amongst the best in the world. Apparently a large percentage of Silicon Valley entrepreneurs are IIT alumni. The CEO of Google is one, Sarin of Vodafone as was is another and I think the CEO of Microsoft might be one also. On top of that its outsourcing business is a world leader with TCS, Wipro, Infosys and 100s of others lesser entities.

      So if India cannot succeed with digital, then I’m afraid for its future.

      Like

      • Charles, Thanks for your response to my comments above.

        Whilst I agree with you that India is producing several technical graduates that rank amongst the best in the world, but still the graduates need experience and that comes with time. No doubt the potential is there, but when it comes to implementation, it takes longer than one expects at the planning stage.

        Briefly, such projects need a generation, provided everyone involved are pulling in the same direction!.

        Let’s hope India is successful in this vast adventure.

        Like

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