Archive for ‘Weather forecast’

15/12/2018

Heavily polluted weather likely to hit parts of China in 10 days: forecast

BEIJING, Dec. 15 (Xinhua) — Affected by “adverse atmospheric diffusion conditions,” heavily polluted weather is like to haunt the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei area and its surrounding regions in the next 10 days, an official forecast said Saturday.

Beijing, in particular, will see a drastic change in air quality, with moderate or serious pollution to come from Dec. 19 to 22. The arrival of northernly winds will help improve the city’s air quality starting from Dec. 23.

Air pollution in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region will gradually ease around Dec. 24 thanks to a cold air effect, said the Ministry of Ecology and Environment in an air quality report for the rest of December.

In the Yangtze River Delta, air quality is expected to stay good or slightly polluted, while in Fenhe and Weihe river basin in Shanxi and Shaanxi provinces, the chances of lasting serious air pollution are slim.

In the next 10 days, air quality in northeastern China will be about average. The central and western part of Liaoning however might suffer from moderate or serious air pollution on Saturday, with PM 2.5 being the primary pollutant. The pollution process will gradually ease from Sunday to Monday thanks to good atmospheric diffusion.

Air pollution of various degrees is also likely to appear in southern, southwest and northwest China.

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18/06/2016

New App Promises to Tell Indian Farmers When to Sow Crops – India Real Time – WSJ

Monsoon season in India has just begun, but farmers in Andhra Pradesh, a southeastern coastal state of India, won’t need to look to the skies to know when to sow their crops.

A new mobile application launched earlier this month and developed by a local agriculture research institute, Microsoft India and the state government tells farmers in the state which week is perfect for sowing seeds, the health of their soil and other indicators.

The app uses rainfall data collected from farms in 13 districts in Andhra Pradesh over 45 years to give farmers a sense of when to start planting, Suhas P. Wani, director of Asia research at the International Crops Research Institute for Semi-Arid Tropics or ICRISAT, a research organization in Hyderabad said.Farmers are asked to register a mobile number with the state government, choose a language–currently limited to the regional Telugu and English–and enter details of the village, district or sub-district.

The advice received could vary from farmer to farmer and from village to village, Mr. Wani said. “The app has crop-specific information such as 10 years of groundnut sowing progress data” to guide farmers who grow specific crops, he added.

He said that constant data on crop yield was being collected on a monthly basis by field officers and sent for evaluation to provide regular forecasts to farmers.

A weather button shows the temperature and rainfall as well as fertilizer recommendations for the day and projection for the next seven days. Additionally, a farmer can get weather alerts for extreme conditions like hailstorms or unseasonal rains that impact crop yields.

Andhra Pradesh logged the highest number of farmer suicides in the country last year. At least 58 farmers took their own lives in the state, according to an agriculture ministry report.

But not every farmer can afford to invest in expensive smartphone technology.

So far, most of the farmers have requested to be sent the information via SMS message. Mr. Wani said once registered, farmers can get the predicted sowing date through SMS. “The main idea behind the application is to help farmers reduce losses by telling when to sow seeds or spray the plants,” he said.

The application will be rolled out in other Indian states next year, based on feedback from farmers in the state, he added.

Source: New App Promises to Tell Indian Farmers When to Sow Crops – India Real Time – WSJ

13/12/2013

China Says Pilot Should Be Able to Land in Low Visibility, Battling High Traffic and Pollution – China Real Time Report – WSJ

If you want to fly in China, you need to be able to land in the smog.

China’s civil aviation regulator has set new rules mandating senior airline pilots operating on major routes into Beijing’s airport be certified to land aircraft under very low visibility, a move to help ease the nation’s worsening air traffic bottlenecks amid often heavy pollution.

China’s major airlines say they have been giving pilots additional training to comply with the new rules, which take effect Jan. 1, according to the carriers and state media.

The decision comes amid worsening pollution across China cities that at times is affecting commercial airline traffic. Last week, thick smog enveloped Shanghai and parts of eastern China,  cutting visibility in the city of Nanjing to less than 50 meters and resulting in many flight delays and cancellations.

Thick smog impacting visibility has also caused cancellations and delays at Beijing Capital International Airport, the nation’s busiest and worst in terms of on-time performance, with only 45% of flights departing on time in November, according to travel industry monitor FlightStats.

Depending on weather conditions and runway infrastructure, modern jetliners have sophisticated instruments to help them land in little or no visibility, such as foggy conditions. Pilots, though, need additional certification to perform such approaches, which usually don’t compromise safety. Airlines have varying rules on minimum visibility levels acceptable for landing, though low-visibility landings are frequently done by major airlines in the West.

The special certification for pilots to make low-visibility landings, a common international requirement, applies to situations where visibility drops to 350 meters or less.

via China Says Pilot Should Be Able to Land in Low Visibility, Battling High Traffic and Pollution – China Real Time Report – WSJ.

02/07/2012

* India to launch $75m mission to forecast rains

BBC News: “India is launching a $75m (£48m) scheme using computer models to understand the south-west monsoonand forecast the rains more accurately, officials say.

Rains have come down pretty heavily this monsoon

Rains have come down pretty heavily this monsoon (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

India receives 80% of its annual rainfall during the summer monsoon between June and September.

A significant shortfall in rain can trigger drought, which can cause great damage to India’s 235 million farmers.

There have been reports that this year’s monsoon has been poor.

“Understanding the monsoon will be a major priority of the government for the next five years,” says Shailesh Nayak, a senior official in the ministry of earth sciences.

He said efforts will be made to understand the rains using computer models developed by the UK and the US and gathering fresh data.

Forecasting the monsoon is a tricky task, as India’s meteorologists have discovered time and again.

Last year they predicted a bad monsoon, but in the end the rains turned out to be in excess of what was forecast.

The Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) admitted later that it was “not very accurate” in its forecasts.

In its 137-year history the IMD has never been able to predict a drought or a flood – the two extremes of a monsoon season – successfully.

Experts say scientists all over the world struggle to forecast weather patterns.

They say the IMD does a “commendable job, putting its reputation on the block” by making monsoon forecasts every year.

Monsoon watchers like Prof J Srinivasan from the Indian Institute of Science says seasonal forecasts for drought and floods are relatively accurate for the Sub-Saharan region in Africa, but no agency in the world has ever been able to predict a drought or flood for the Indian region.”

via BBC News – India to launch $75m mission to forecast rains.

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