Archive for ‘Go West’

07/05/2014

In China’s Xinjiang, economic divide seen fuelling ethnic unrest | Reuters

Hundreds of migrant workers from distant corners of China pour daily into the Urumqi South railway station, their first waypoint on a journey carrying them to lucrative work in other parts of the far western Xinjiang region.

Uighur women stand next to a street to wait for a bus in downtown Urumqi, Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region May 1, 2014. REUTERS-Petar Kujundzic

Like the columns of police toting rifles and metal riot spears that weave between migrants resting on their luggage, the workers are a fixture at the station, which last week was targeted by a bomb and knife attack the government has blamed on religious extremists.

“We come this far because the wages are good,” Shi Hongjiang, 26, from the southwestern metropolis of Chongqing, told Reuters outside the station. “Also, the Uighur population is small. There aren’t enough of them to do the work.”

Shi’s is a common refrain from migrant workers, whose experience finding low-skilled work is very different to that of the Muslim Uighur minority.

Employment discrimination, experts say, along with a demographic shift that many Uighurs feel is diluting their culture, is fuelling resentment that spills over into violent attacks directed at Han Chinese, China’s majority ethnic group.

The apparent suicide attack on the station, which killed one bystander, was the latest violence to hit Xinjiang, despite a pledge from China’s President Xi Jinping to rain “crushing blows against violent terrorist forces”.

via In China’s Xinjiang, economic divide seen fuelling ethnic unrest | Reuters.

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09/06/2013

China Talent Outflow Highest in the World, People’s Daily Says

Bloomberg: “China is losing top-notch talent at the highest rate in the world as students who seek degrees abroad opt to remain overseas, the official People’s Daily newspaper reported today.

China University Students

An average of 87 percent of students in science and engineering stay overseas, the newspaper said, citing an official from a government working group on talent whom it didn’t identify. China needs to compete better for human talent, the report cited the official as saying.

Young Chinese have flocked to overseas schools in search of degrees. The country’s policy of limiting many couples to one child and its growing wealth mean middle-class families can afford U.S. tuition that far exceeds the costs of Chinese universities.

Chinese citizens now account for the largest proportion of foreign students at U.S. universities, the Institute of International Education said in a November report. Chinese enrollments at U.S. universities in the 2011-2012 academic year increased by 23 percent, it said.

The country lacks high-level innovative and entrepreneurial talent, the People’s Daily cited the official as saying. Investment is not sufficient and institutional obstacles have not been eliminated, it said.”

via China Talent Outflow Highest in the World, People’s Daily Says – Bloomberg.

14/04/2013

The real cause and impact of China’s labour shortage

So far this labour shortage has not had a significant impact on the economy. But if ignored, it will.

China Daily Mail

China continues to suffer a labour shortage in its key coastal manufacturing regions. This, no doubt, is impacting U.S. and other foreign companies operating in China. But the labour shortage is not due to a lack of available workers. Instead, it is prompted by Chinese government policies, as well as prevailing work and living conditions in affected regions.

The Alienation of Migrant Workers

During the last two decades of China’s development, rural workers migrating to urban manufacturing regions have been the chief source of labour in coastal cities. According to the Chinese government’s, own statistics, migrant workers have increased to more than 250 million from just over 60 million in the last 20 years. Many non-government organisations place this number at a more realistic 350 to 400 million.

Even with a massive number of workers available nationally, China Daily recently reported that labour shortages are growing worse in cities like Guangzhou

View original post 935 more words

30/12/2012

* Chengdu aims to be world’s next Silicon Valley

SCMP: “Entrepreneurs in China’s southwest are dreaming of turning the city of Chengdu into the world’s next Silicon Valley as the government encourages more investment outside the booming coastal regions.

applechengdu.jpg

Small start-ups as well as big-name western companies have flocked to the metropolis of 14 million people, attracted by cheap labour costs and favourable government investment policies and hoping to tap into China’s rapidly expanding consumer market.

And the Silicon Valley dream is becoming reality as the city, already a hi-tech manufacturing hub, seeks increasingly to become a magnet for software development and innovation.

Between one-third to one-half of the iPads sold worldwide are assembled in Chengdu, while computer giant Intel makes up to half of its chips in the city.

Far from the booming coastal regions, Chengdu can offer perks through the government’s “Go West” development programme, with incentives for start-ups such as one-year interest-free loans.

So far it has attracted about 29,000 companies to its 130-square-kilometre “hi-tech development zone”, including about 1,000 foreign enterprises.

Chengdu is also developing a nearby “Software Park” as the city aims to go beyond manufacturing and become a centre of innovation.”

via Chengdu aims to be world’s next Silicon Valley | South China Morning Post.

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