Posts tagged ‘Loan’

27/01/2016

The Drivers of Growth in China’s New Normal – China Real Time Report – WSJ

As China’s economic growth slows and the manufacturing and industrial sectors face declines, many companies are trying to determine whether or where they can tap into more growth.

The old drivers of the economy, including the middle class and the export sector, are out. What’s in for China’s so-called “new normal” is the upper-middle class and the service sector.

Affluent shoppers under the age of 35 and Internet surfers will push China’s consumer market up to $6.5 trillion in sales by 2020, an increase of 54% from 2015, according to consultancy the Boston Consulting Group. Upper-middle class households, defined as those making between $24,001 and $46,000 in annual income, will double to 100 million in population by 2020 and account for 30% of all urban households in the country.

Consumption is not isolated from the slowdown, but China hasn’t stopped shopping, consultancy The Boston Consulting Group said in a recent report. Consumption growth this year is poised to outpace GDP growth, which economists expect to range between 6% and 6.6%, BCG said.

Source: The Drivers of Growth in China’s New Normal – China Real Time Report – WSJ

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05/03/2015

Funding the unfunded: India helps small business borrow to grow | Reuters

A new bank announced in the annual budget last week could boost loans and cut borrowing costs for India’s cash-starved small businesses — tailors, mechanics and phone booth operators who account for around a fifth of the economy.

A worker operates a lathe machine as he makes a steel cutter at a manufacturing unit in Noida, on the outskirts of New Delhi November 3, 2014. REUTERS/Anindito Mukherjee/Files

MUDRA bank – to be set up with $3.2 billion of capital to help microfinancing firms to lend more – should help leverage up firms which account for 40 percent of India’s exports, just as India tries to rekindle growth, lenders and entrepreneurs say.

India’s small businesses employ more than 106 million workers, according to government statistics, in a country that brings a million new workers into the workforce every month.

Yet according to government estimates, only 4 percent of 57.7 million small business units in India have access to institutional finance, leaving many to rely on informal lenders. Industry experts estimate that demand for loans from the sector outstrips supply by more than $80 billion.

Rating agency Crisil estimates that microfinance lenders have loan assets totalling $5.6 billion. But they have had a limited impact on small businesses as they primarily target lending to individuals or groups of individuals among the poor.

Even for the microfinance institutions that would like to lend more to businesses, rules cap the amount they can lend to a single borrower at 50,000 rupees ($803), making them an unviable option for many businesses.

via Funding the unfunded: India helps small business borrow to grow | Reuters.

21/01/2015

China’s “new normal” of investment brings new opportunity for win-win – Xinhua | English.news.cn

For the first time in its history, China has become a net capital exporter with outbound direct investment outnumbering foreign direct investment in 2014, presenting new opportunities for win-win cooperation with the rest of the world.

China's "new normal" of investment brings new opportunity for win-win

At the Annual Meeting of the World Economic Forum (WEF) scheduled for Jan. 21-24 in Davos, Switzerland, Chinese Premier Li Keqiang will expound on the Chinese economy‘s “new normal.”

Chinese investors channeled capital into 6,128 overseas firms in 156 countries and regions in 2014, with outbound investment reaching 102.89 billion U.S. dollars, up 14.1 percent from a year earlier, according to a press conference by the Ministry of Commerce (MOC) on Wednesday.

Growth was much faster than the 1.7 percent gain recorded in foreign direct investment, which was 119.6 billion dollars. This is the first time the two-way nominal capital flows have been near a balance.

“If the Chinese firms’ investment through third parties were included, the total ODI volume would reach about 140 billion dollars, which means China is already a net outbound investor,” said Shen Danyang, spokesman with MOC.

Chinese investors are investing in real estate, businesses and other assets overseas while growth at home is slowing. The country registered the slowest expansion pace in 2014 in 24 years, according to the GDP data released Tuesday.

The slowdown comes at a vulnerable time for the world economy — the eurozone is still at risk of another recession, the Abenomics has failed to drag Japan out of the mire, and investors are pulling out of emerging market funds.

Policymakers and investors were not prepared for a reality that after more than three decades on steroids, the world’s second-largest economy has been transitioned to a “new normal” of slower growth.

The market, crazy about speed and figures, seems to have missed the reality that the Chinese economy is healthier under the “new normal” featuring positive trends of stable growth, an optimized structure, enhanced quality and improved social welfare.

China’s sound economic fundamentals have not changed and the government will maintain macro-policies appropriate, Premier Li said during a meeting with Klaus Schwab, founder and executive chairman of the WEF on Tuesday.

The improvement of the quality and efficiency of the Chinese economy and its upgrading will make important contributions to maintaining the stability and healthy development of the world economy and finance, Li said.

The Chinese economy, shifting focus to consumption and investment from polluting heavy industry and manufacturing via complex reforms, will continue to function as a vital ballast for the world economy.

Besides, Beijing aims to create an open capital market by pushing ahead with a broad range of financial reforms to allow more foreign investment and encourage Chinese players to invest abroad. The more transparent and efficient allocation of the Chinese capital will have a positive effect on the global market.

In the process, China has proposed or promoted a host of initiatives and plans, such as the initiatives on the Silk Road Economic Zone, the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road, the BRICS Development Bank and the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank.

It is fair to say that China’s capital export is creating life blood for the global economy to avoid the risk of declining.

In light of financial difficulty faced by Asia in realizing inter-connectivity and mutual access, China has pledged to contribute 40 billion U.S. dollars to setting up a Silk Road Fund to provide financial support for infrastructure construction, resources exploration and industrial cooperation for countries along the “One Belt and One Road.”

It is estimated that in the next decade, China’s outbound investment will total 1,250 billion dollars, giving more impetus to the worlds’ economic growth.

via Spotlight: China’s “new normal” of investment brings new opportunity for win-win – Xinhua | English.news.cn.

26/03/2014

Spooked by defaults, China banks begin retreat from risk | Reuters

Reuters has contacted over 80 companies with elevated debt ratios or problems with overcapacity. Interviews with 15 that agreed to discuss their funding showed that more discriminate lending, long a missing ingredient of China’s economic transformation, has become a reality.

A company logo of Chaori Solar is seen at the 12th China Photovoltaic Conference and International Photovoltaic Exhibition in Beijing, September 5, 2012. REUTERS/Stringer

Up against a cooling Chinese economy and signs that authorities will not step in every time a loan goes bad, banks are becoming more hard-nosed and selective about whom they lend to.

There are signs that even state-owned firms, in the past fawned over by lenders for their government connections, have to contend with higher rates, lower lending limits and more onerous checks by banks.

“Interest rates are going up 10 percent for the entire industry,” said Wang Lei, a finance department manager at PKU HealthCare Corp (000788.SZ). “Obtaining loans is getting difficult and expensive.”

via Spooked by defaults, China banks begin retreat from risk | Reuters.

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04/01/2014

Tiny Loans for Tiny Homes – India Real Time – WSJ

From what began as a small experiment helping slum dwellers buy homes in Mumbai, Micro Housing Finance Corporation Ltd. has grown into a multi-million dollar business making loans across the country.

The Mumbai-based company, which gives low-income households loans to buy homes, now operates in more than 15 cities, with Coimbatore, in the southern state of Tamil Nadu, being the most recent addition just last month.

“Housing finance companies focus on serving the top 3% to 5% of the population because it’s easier and cheaper,” to give big loans to rich people, said Madhusudhan Menon, chairman of Micro Housing Finance. “No one wants [low income] customers who don’t have documentation of their income.”

The lack of home loans to those most in need of them is one of the main reasons more than 90% of India’s acute housing shortage of around 19 million units falls on the urban poor, according to a report released by real-estate consultancy Jones Lang LaSalle.

For most of the urban poor, owning an apartment with reliable electricity or even a water connection is out of reach even if they have a regular income because banks refuse to give the poor housing loans.

More than 41% of the population of the megacity of Mumbai lives in slums, defined as residential areas unfit for human habitation due to dilapidation, over-crowding, poor ventilation and lack of sanitation facilities, according to government estimates. That figure could be brought down sharply if builders constructed affordable housing for the city’s hardworking poor and housing finance companies gave them long-term home loans.

via Tiny Loans for Tiny Homes – India Real Time – WSJ.

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04/12/2013

Connecting borrowers and lenders: Indians try peer-to-peer model | India Insight

Srinivas Porika tried for months to get a loan of 250,000 rupees ($4,000) to pay for his sister’s wedding, but every bank he tried turned him down. The problem: Porika’s employer, a tech start-up company, was not on the banks’ lists of pre-approved companies.

“They were ready to give me a credit card, but were not ready to give me a loan,” said the 28-year-old from Hyderabad, who met several bank managers and officials to plead his case.

The wedding went ahead in 2012, but only after Porika dipped into his savings and borrowed from friends. With an insufficient bonus at work and pressure mounting to pay off his debts this year, Porika turned to a peer-to-peer (P2P) lending website.

Entrepreneurs in India are now experimenting with the P2P business model, helping people like Porika, with websites such as i-lend.in and faircent.com providing a meeting ground for borrowers and lenders.

Such portals charge an upfront fee from both groups and get the borrower’s documents and employment details verified by a third party. A contract with terms and conditions is signed within a week, with a recovery process in place for those who default on payments.

Lenders can choose from a list of verified borrowers on the website. They are also advised to spread their investment among borrowers to lessen the risk of default.

via Connecting borrowers and lenders: Indians try peer-to-peer model | India Insight.

02/03/2012

* China to boost local govt debt (of over USD 1.5 trillion) clean-up

China Daily: “China will boost the clean-up of thousands of millions of local government’s debt in 2012, so to guard against possible defaults that would hurt its banks, the country’s bankingregulator said Thursday.

The country will focus on cleaning up old loans made to local government financing vehicles(LGFV) while tightening new debt issues and raising cash to debt coverage ratios, China Banking Regulatory Commission (CBRC) said on its website.

The CBRC will strictly control the use of LGFV loans, while giving priority to key projects that are under construction, it said. The regulator will also improve risk monitoring and reclassify LGFV loans to relieve pressure from banks.

Local government debts had risen to 10.72 trillion yuan (1.7 trillion US dollars) by the end of 2010, accounting for about 26.9 percent of China’s gross domestic product, according to data released by the National Audit Office.

Analysts fret that if a certain proportion of the loans have gone sour, it will push up non-performing loan ratios in the banking industry and threaten banks’ credit ratings.

Local governments typically invested the money they borrowed in building infrastructure. They also faced huge repayment pressure in 2011 and now also in 2012.”

http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2012-03/02/content_14735361.htm

China is taking steps to rein in the extraordinary splurge it generated in the aftermath of the 2008-09 financial crisis by encouraging local government initiatives. It is primarily this LG debt that has caused China’s debt to GDP ratio to increase from less than 20% to over 40 % in two years.

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