Archive for ‘zhejiang province’

06/06/2019

People celebrate upcoming Dragon Boat Festival across China

CHINA-DUANWU-FOLK CUSTOMS (CN)

Participants perform land boating in Huixingu resort in Miaoshan Village of Miaoxi Township, Huzhou City, east China’s Zhejiang Province, June 6, 2019. Various activities have been held to celebrate the upcoming Dragon Boat Festival, or Duanwu, which falls on June 7 this year. (Xinhua/Huang Zongzhi)

Source: Xinhua

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23/05/2019

Yangtze Delta provinces and municipality see digital economy over 1 trln yuan

NANJING, May 22 (Xinhua) — The digital economy of east China’s Yangtze Delta region including the provinces of Zhejiang and Jiangsu, and Shanghai Municipality exceeded one trillion yuan (145 billion U.S. dollars) respectively, according to a Tuesday summit in Jiangsu.

Statistics show that Jiangsu, Zhejiang and Shanghai saw their digital economy reach 3 trillion yuan, 2 trillion yuan and one trillion yuan respectively in 2018, reporting record growth in the Yangtze Delta region.

“The digital economy is leading today’s scientific and technological revolution and industrial change,” said Yan Li, vice chairman of Jiangsu provincial political consultative conference. “The Yangtze Delta region should cooperate in building a pilot zone of China’s digital economic development,” said Yan.

The region should enhance cooperation in developing infrastructure and cultivating software talents, said Zhou Hanmin, head of Shanghai Institute of Socialism. “Talents are the pillar for the digital economy and the region’s educational sectors should work together to exploit their strength.”

China’s digital economy reached 31.3 trillion yuan (about 4.6 trillion U.S. dollars) in 2018, accounting for 34.8 percent of the country’s total GDP.

Source: Xinhua

20/05/2019

Across China: Beekeeping goes digital

HANGZHOU, May 19 (Xinhua) — Beekeepers in China’s high-tech powerhouse of Zhejiang Province have developed a smart way of using intelligent beehives to revolutionize bee farming.

Over 300 apiculture insiders and experts convened in Chun’an County on Saturday to witness the pilot.

More than 2,600 artificial beehives have been arranged in mountains in the western outskirts of Hangzhou, the provincial capital.

Chen Pinghua, chair of Qiandao Lake Mozhidao Biotechnology Co. Ltd., which operates the bee farm, said the smart hives were installed with sensors at the bottom, which can monitor and regulate the temperature and humidity and send the data on the number of times the bees enter and leave as well as the weight of the hive for technicians to determine whether the honey has matured.

Each hive is also pasted with a unique QR code that traces the source of the honey to ensure food safety, Chen said.

He said staff could open an app on their mobile phones to monitor the real-time data of each hive, which greatly improves efficiency.

Saturday coincided with World Honey Bee Day designated by the United Nations in 2017 to spread awareness on the significance of bees, which pollinate one-third of the world’s grain-producing plants.

“Beekeeping has a long history in China, but it has remained as a very low-end business without standards for hives and on how bees are raised and how honey is harvested,” said Yang Yibo, deputy secretary-general of the Eco-Apiculture Committee of the China Association for the Promotion of Quality.

He said the smart hive system had significance in digitizing the information of honey sources, bee colonies and beekeepers, and forming visualized big data to help analyze the quality in each procedure.

The annual output of honey in China exceeds 400,000 tonnes, and the country’s output of propolis, bee pollen and beeswax rank first in the world. More than 300,000 people are employed in the business.

Wang Fuchun, a veteran bee farmer in Chun’an, said with the high-tech bee farming, a hive could produce more than 30 kg of honey a year, almost quadrupling the amount produced in the traditional way.

The company plans to put 10,000 more smart hives in the mountain region this year.

Source: Xinhua

10/05/2019

Chinese truck driver collapses steel bridge and dumps 100-tonne load of concrete pipes into river

  • Driver who used map app to find construction site sent to crossing for light traffic
  • Villagers say bridge was used by pedestrians and cars only
Recovery crews attempt to pull the truck and its load from the river in eastern Zhejiang province. Photo: Weibo
Recovery crews attempt to pull the truck and its load from the river in eastern Zhejiang province. Photo: Weibo
A trucker in eastern Zhejiang province collapsed a steel bridge by crossing it with a load weighing 50 times the bridge’s capacity.
The driver, surnamed Zhang, said he missed the two-tonne load warning sign when he tried to take dozens of concrete pipes to a construction site on Thursday morning, Kankannews.com reported.
He was not familiar with the area and used the bridge suggested by his digital map.
When the laden truck, weighing about 100 tonnes, was halfway across, the structure gave way, pitching the vehicle and its cargo into the water below. The driver managed to escape.
The truck’s load was 50 times the bridge’s breaking capacity. Photo: Weibo
The truck’s load was 50 times the bridge’s breaking capacity. Photo: Weibo
Truck driver left hanging after crane smashes into bridge
Residents of a nearby village said a concrete bridge on the site fell into disrepair and was dismantled. It was replaced with a temporary steel structure a couple of years ago.

The new span was intended only for foot traffic and light vehicles, they said.

The pipes were recovered on Thursday evening.

Source: SCMP

07/05/2019

China, Japan to hold talks on maritime affairs

BEIJING, May 7 (Xinhua) — China and Japan will hold their 11th round of high-level consultations on maritime affairs in Otaru, Japan, from May 10 to 11, a foreign ministry spokesperson said Tuesday.

Spokesperson Geng Shuang told a routine news briefing that officials from foreign ministries, defense ministries, maritime law enforcement and management departments of both counties will attend the talks.

China expects to fully exchange views with Japan on maritime issues of common concern to strengthen mutual understanding and trust with Japan, Geng said.

The China-Japan high-level consultations on maritime affairs were established in 2012. The last round of consultations was held in Wuzhen of eastern China’s Zhejiang Province last December.

Source: Xinhua

06/05/2019

China fires up drills near Taiwan Strait in test of combat strength

  • Military exercises this week meant to foster image that Beijing can win a war over the island, analyst says
The PLA is staging live-fire drills at the northern end of the Taiwan Strait this week. Photo: AP
The PLA is staging live-fire drills at the northern end of the Taiwan Strait this week. Photo: AP
Beijing is conducting live-fire military drills at the northern end of the Taiwan Strait as it signals its resolve to thwart “pro-independence forces” in Taiwan.
Authorities in the small city of Yuhuan, Zhejiang province, notified the public on Sunday that a “no-sail zone” and “no-fishing zone” would be in effect in the area until Friday night.
It said the drills were part of the People’s Liberation Army’s “annual regular exercise plans” and would involve “actual use of weapons”.
“According to the annual [PLA’s] regular training plan … live-fire exercises involving the use of real weapons will be organised … in the designated areas from 6am on May 5 to 6pm on May 10,” the authorities said.
Collin Koh, a military analyst from the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies at Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University, said the stress on the live-fire manoeuvres suggested the six-day exercise would simulate real combat conditions.
The drills come hard on the heels of an annual report by the Pentagon warning that China was preparing options to unify Taiwan by force, and there was a need to deter, delay or deny any third-party intervention on Taiwan’s behalf.
Under the Taiwan Relations Act, the United States is bound by law to help defend the self-ruled island. Washington is Taipei’s main source of arms, selling the island more than US$15 billion in weaponry since 2010, according to the Pentagon.
Beijing ‘loses all hope for Taiwan’s Tsai Ing-wen’ as she rallies Washington

Taiwan is one of a growing number of flashpoints in the China-US relationship – along with a trade war, Beijing’s growing influence in emerging economies, and its stronger military posture in the South China Sea. On Monday, two guided-missile destroyers, USS Preble and USS Chung-Hoon passed within 12 nautical miles of Gaven and Johnson reefs in the Spratly Islands, drawing immediate criticism from Beijing.

In addition, Taiwan will hold its annual Han Kuang live-fire drills from May 27 to 31 and held a computer-aided one just last month.

A Taiwan affairs analyst from the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences said the drills off Zhejiang were meant to show Beijing’s determination to defend its position on Taiwan.

“Beijing is trying to build up an image that China can win a war over Taiwan and Beijing’s key goal is to contain pro-independence forces, which are the biggest threat now to the peaceful unification process,” the analyst said.

Koh agreed, saying the drill sent a signal to external and domestic parties after the recent high-profile transits of US warships through the Taiwan Strait.

“The messaging to domestic audience is necessary because Beijing can’t be seen as weak following those reported transits by foreign warships – especially the Americans who are seen as supporting Taipei,” Koh said.

“And regarding external audience, the messaging is quite obviously to demonstrate that Beijing is ready to respond more resolutely to future such transits, following the tough verbal responses from Beijing, including its statement that it considers the strait under its jurisdiction and comprise its internal waters.”

Beijing ‘tones down’ response after US warships sail through Taiwan Strait

Relations between Beijing and Taipei have plunged since Tsai Ing-wen from the independence-leaning Democratic Progressive Party won the presidential election in 2016 and repeatedly refused to accept the “1992 consensus”, which Beijing says is the foundation for cross-strait dialogue.

In response, Beijing ramped up pressure against the island, including conducting more military exercises and establishing diplomatic ties with Taipei’s allies.

Source: SCMP

02/05/2019

China’s roads jammed as millions take Labour Day holiday

  • Major highways gridlocked for hours at start of four-day break
  • Chaos at railway stations as ticket-holding passengers turned away
Holiday crowds pack the promenade on the Bund along the Huangpu River in Shanghai on the first day of China’s May break. Photo: AFP
Holiday crowds pack the promenade on the Bund along the Huangpu River in Shanghai on the first day of China’s May break. Photo: AFP
China’s Labour Day holiday started on Wednesday with gridlocked roads and chaos at railway stations as millions of people took advantage of this year’s unusually long break.
Motorists reported being stuck in traffic jams which did not move for hours, while ticket-holding passengers were turned away from some trains due to severe overcrowding on the first day of the holiday.
Travel agency Ctrip estimated that around 160 million domestic tourists would be travelling over the four-day break, according to data from travel booking platforms.
Forty major highways recorded a 75 per cent spike in traffic on Wednesday, according to Xinhua, as toll fares for cars were suspended for the holiday.
Tourists enjoy the first day of China’s four-day May holiday on a beach in Haikou, Hainan province, southern China. Photo: Xinhua
Tourists enjoy the first day of China’s four-day May holiday on a beach in Haikou, Hainan province, southern China. Photo: Xinhua

Monitoring stations on major routes – including the Beijing-Tibet Expressway, the Shanghai-Shaanxi Expressway, Shanghai’s Humin Elevated Road and the Beijing section of the Beijing-Hong Kong-Macau Expressway – recorded a 200 per cent increase in traffic from Tuesday onwards, Xinhua said.

The Ministry of Public Security’s traffic management bureau has warned holiday motorists to drive safely, especially on winding mountainside routes.

Online news portal The Paper reported on Thursday that traffic jams on some major routes were so severe that the drive from Shanghai to Hangzhou, capital of neighbouring Zhejiang province, took some travellers seven hours instead of the usual two.

Passengers board the train at Chongqing North Railway Station in southwest China on Tuesday, hoping to beat the May holiday travel rush. Photo: Xinhua
Passengers board the train at Chongqing North Railway Station in southwest China on Tuesday, hoping to beat the May holiday travel rush. Photo: Xinhua
Meanwhile, more than 54,000 tourists visited the popular Badaling section of the Great Wall on Wednesday, according to Beijing Youth Daily. The attraction’s management team had increased the number of volunteers, parking spaces and shuttle buses to prepare for the influx, the report said.
More than 53,000 tourists had visited the Shanghai International Tourism Resort and Shanghai Disneyland by 4pm on Wednesday, according to data from the Shanghai municipal government’s real-time visitor tracker. The Shanghai Zoo attracted more than 24,000 people, and more than 9,200 visited the Shanghai Science and Technology Museum.
Despite the crowds, no records were broken at the Shanghai attractions, which reached about 70 per cent of their maximum visitor numbers recorded, The Paper reported.
At railway stations, ticket-holding passengers were stopped from boarding trains between Nanjing and the city of Zibo in Shandong province, eastern China, due to severe overcrowding, Beijing Youth Daily reported on Wednesday.
Station staff promised full refunds to customers with pre-booked tickets who were refused entry.
Source: SCMP
29/04/2019

Racers tear through Chinese city streets in rented Porsche sports cars

  • Dangerous midnight speed drive fuelled by drinking and karaoke session
  • High-performance cars seen switching lanes, driving on the wrong side of the road and running a red light
Two men have been detained in eastern China for racing their rented Porsche sports cars on city streets. Photo: Handout
Two men have been detained in eastern China for racing their rented Porsche sports cars on city streets. Photo: Handout
An alcohol-fuelled midnight street race between two high-powered sports cars in an eastern Chinese city has landed two men in detention.
At one point, according to police in Zhuji, Zhejiang province, the rented Porsche cars hit 170km/h (105mph) as they tore through the city, randomly switching lanes, running a red light and even driving on the wrong side of the road.
A police investigation found the culprits had been drinking alcohol at a karaoke singing session before deciding to test their driving skills.
One of them, a 21-year-old university student surnamed Ying, had rented the yellow Porsche for a month for 20,000 yuan (US$3,000). The other man, a 24-year-old surnamed Jiang, had rented the white Porsche for a day at 800 yuan because he wanted to race his friend.
Chinese are buying more used cars online — without kicking a tyre
Ying was arrested two days after the illegal race and confessed, the police statement said.

Local police started receiving calls from residents at around midnight on April 22, complaining at the loud racing going on through the streets.

In a statement on the WeChat social messaging app, police said footage from more than 10 security cameras showed a yellow Porsche and a white one chasing each other in a dangerous manner down a main road past a hospital and numerous residential compounds.

Speeding has been a criminal offence in China since 2011. According to Chinese law, “whoever races a motor vehicle on a road with execrable circumstances or drives a motor vehicle on a road while intoxicated shall be sentenced to criminal detention and a fine.”

Source: SCMP

29/04/2019

China’s quest for clean energy heats up with groundbreaking ‘artificial sun’ project

    • Fusion reactor built by Chinese scientists in eastern Anhui province has notched up a series of research firsts
    • There are plans to build a separate facility that could start generating commercially viable fusion power by 2050, official says
    The Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) device – or “artificial sun” – in Hefei, Anhui province. Photo: AFP/Chinese Academy of Sciences
    The Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) device – or “artificial sun” – in Hefei, Anhui province. Photo: AFP/Chinese Academy of Sciences
    A groundbreaking fusion reactor built by Chinese scientists is underscoring Beijing’s determination to be at the core of clean energy technology, as it eyes a fully functioning plant by 2050.
    Sometimes called an “artificial sun” for the sheer heat and power it produces, the doughnut-shaped Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) that juts out on a spit of land into a lake in eastern Anhui province, has notched up a succession of research firsts.
    In 2017 it became the world’s first such facility to sustain certain conditions necessary for nuclear fusion for 
    longer than 100 seconds

    , and last November hit a

    personal-best temperature

    of 100 million degrees Celsius (212 million Fahrenheit) – six times as hot as the sun’s core.

    Such mind-boggling temperatures are crucial to achieving fusion reactions, which promise an inexhaustible energy source.

    EAST’s main reactor stands within a concrete structure, with pipes and cables spread outward like spokes connecting to a jumble of censors and other equipment encircling the core. A red Chinese flag stands on top of the reactor.

    A vacuum vessel inside the fusion reactor, which has achieved a temperature of 100 million degrees Celsius – six times as hot as the sun’s core. Photo: AFP/Chinese Academy of Sciences
    A vacuum vessel inside the fusion reactor, which has achieved a temperature of 100 million degrees Celsius – six times as hot as the sun’s core. Photo: AFP/Chinese Academy of Sciences

    “We are hoping to expand international cooperation through this device [EAST] and make Chinese contributions to mankind’s future use of nuclear fusion,” said Song Yuntao, a top official involved in the project, on a recent tour of the facility.

    China is also aiming to build a separate fusion reactor that could begin generating commercially viable fusion power by mid-century, he added.

    Some 6 billion yuan (US$891.5 million) has been promised for the ambitious project.

    EAST is part of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project, which seeks to prove the feasibility of fusion power.

    Funded and run by the European Union, India, Japan, China, Russia, South Korea and the United States, the multibillion-dollar project’s centrepiece will be a giant cylindrical fusion device, called a tokamak.

    Now under construction in Provence in southern France, it will incorporate parts developed at the EAST and other sites, and draw on their research findings.

    China is “hoping to expand international cooperation” through EAST. Photo: Reuters
    China is “hoping to expand international cooperation” through EAST. Photo: Reuters

    Fusion is considered the Holy Grail of energy and is what powers our sun.

    It merges atomic nuclei to create massive amounts of energy – the opposite of the fission process used in atomic weapons and nuclear power plants, which splits them into fragments.

    Unlike fission, fusion emits no greenhouse gases and carries less risk of accidents or the theft of atomic material.

    But achieving fusion is both extremely difficult and prohibitively expensive – the total cost of ITER is estimated at 20 billion (US$22.3 billion).

    Wu Songtao, a top Chinese engineer with ITER, conceded that China’s technical capabilities on fusion still lag behind more developed countries, and that US and

    Japanese tokamaks have achieved more valuable overall results.

    But the Anhui test reactor underlines China’s fast-improving scientific advancement and its commitment to achieve yet more.

    China’s capabilities “have developed rapidly in the past 20 years, especially after catching the ITER express train”, Wu said.

    In an interview with state-run Xinhua news agency in 2017, ITER’s director general Bernard Bigot lauded China’s government as “highly motivated” on fusion.

    “Fusion is not something that one country can accomplish alone,” Song said.

    “As with ITER, people all over the world need to work together on this.”

Source: SCMP

15/04/2019

China’s online authors grow 3.82 mln in 3 years

HANGZHOU, April 14 (Xinhua) — China had 8.62 million online authors as of 2018, a significant increase from 4.8 million in 2015, according to a national conference on digital reading.

Among the digital reading materials, original online works took up 79.8 percent last year, up from 69 percent three years ago, while Liu Shu, vice president of Amazon China, said that e-book readers still love classic works.

An industry report released by the China Audio-Video and Digital Publishing Association at the conference showed that the value of China’s digital reading market reached 25.4 billion yuan last year, a 19.6 percent yearly growth.

About 432 million Chinese read digital publications on electronic devices during the year, averaging 12.4 digital publications per person and 71.3 minutes per read, the report said.

Over 66 percent of the respondents of the report were willing to pay for digital publications, up from 60.3 percent in 2016.

Since 2015, the conference has been held annually in east China’s city of Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province before World Book Day, which falls on April 23.

Source: Xinhua

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